Garry's blog

The SS Empire Windrush Legacy & Celebration Ball

In 1948, after World War II, Britain was unable to be self-sustainable and so invited people form the Caribbean, on the Empire Windrush to come and help rebuild the nation. It means that Empire Windrush had the dubious title of reminding Britain of its own weakness, but a weakness that it has turned a broken nation into one with a collective strength, as Windrush marks a point of origin in which any non-white British Citizen could become a source of national pride.

Welcome to our new Book Blogger...She Reads Black

I have always been an avid reader. Obsessively so, some - mainly my mother - may suggest. Growing up, our shelves were always filled with books. Admittedly, they were a diverse collection of mainly superficially gratifying, 'trashy' reads. I would devour everything with gusto and my insatiable appetite for reading knew no bounds: no biography, autobiography, Mills and Boon, Sweet Valley High, thriller, chick-lit book was safe in my presence.

Wipers Heritage day @ Coventry Belgrade Theatre

Belgrade Theatre Coventry

Discover your Hidden History
11am - 2pm, Sat 14 May

Tickets: FREE Event

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Dates & Times
Did you know that four million men and women from Britain’s colonies volunteered for service during the First and Second world war?

Did you know that over one million South Asian soldiers joined the allied forces in WW1 and that nearly 20,000 Caribbean soldiers served on the front line in the Somme, Passchendaele and, on the Middle Eastern Front, Palestine and Egypt?

A SPOTLIGHT ON: WORLD WAR I AND THE BLACK PERSPECTIVE

A SPOTLIGHT ON: WORLD WAR I AND THE BLACK PERSPECTIVE
We’re very pleased that Garry Stewart, Director of Recognize Black Heritage and Culture will be joining us to deliver a talk about the contributions of African and Caribbean communities to World War I.

This fascinating talk will explain the background and involvement of these communities to World War I efforts and explore some of the reasons why, until recently, this contribution was washed away from the post war narrative.

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